Schoology: The First Two Weeks

I was inspired to write this post after reading Rich Colosi’s blog article, “Six Tips for Starting Your Schoology Course.” For those who are new to using a Learning Management System (LMS), such as Schoology, you’ll find his tips on getting your classes set up and running helpful. Also, people should read Dylan Rodger’s blog, which offers solid ways that units can be organized. You may find it helpful to read these article before continuing into this post.

This is at least my third year starting with an LMS; however, it’s a first for me to be a paid subscriber and to have the full Enterprise version of Schoology with the capability to be used by all students and teachers at Canandaigua Academy. While the set up of my classes wasn’t impacted by this, the results long-term impacts of this integration building wide are, for me,

I’ve found that setting up my classes in Schoology isn’t a whole lot different from the moves that I make when setting up a regular classroom. It takes some planning foresight, logical organization, and a committment to creating working long-term program.

Here are some things that I do:

  1. Build it and they will come. It’s important that when bringing students to an LMS, there has to be content there for them to work with, and there’s purpose for why students are there. Make sure you have either a calendar populated, folders with course content in them, even if it’s as repository system, an assignment to turn in, a quiz to take, a discussion to contribute to.

Without it, where’s the rationale for using the tool. So, it means that the teacher needs to have  some reasons to use Schoology. What I recommend is to pick one way that you can use it, do it, and then add other purposes as the year goes on.

2. Like what Colossi suggests, organize by folders and create a numbering system. Can’t agree more. However, content is organized, work to give students a guide. When I go into Schoology the first time with my students, we open the folder for the first unit, I direct them to the first page in the folder. It’s a unit plan or outline to follow, and each item in the unit is given a task, goal or quest number. See below:

screenshot-2016-09-18-at-7-54-13-am

Each of these items is then linked to the assignment, video, link that they need to accomplish. What I’ve found is that students can independently move through the tasks, I can assist where necessary, as well as give target dates on where they should be in the module, and spend class time in conferences with students. An ordering system like this also makes it easy for kids who weren’t in class to figure out what they need to accomplish.

While I don’t share it here with students, simply to try to keep it streamlined, I have each of these tasks linked to a Common Core standard.

3. No substitutions. One of my fears when starting to use a LMS was that students would have problems with the technology or wouldn’t be able to find materials, or that they just wouldn’t work. When students came to me and said, ” I couldn’t find this,” or “It didn’t work,” I was pretty accommodating and took things in paper, made extra paper copies, and allowed excuses.

As I’ve grown more comfortable, I’ve stopped that enabling. Once it’s made clear that this is the mode by which business will be conducted, these problems disappear. Teachers shouldn’t have to apologize for their planning, how they give resources, or the integration of technology into the classroom. Additionally, at all levels we need to stop rationalizing, privileging and normalizing the idea that “Computers don’t like me.”

4. Model. With the above in mind, I realized that anything I wanted to do in Schoology, I had to teach and model. Once I showed them how to submit an assignment, I knew they could do it, and then there were no excuses. We do this with other things, so why not with this? Link students with the Schoology help menu, which is rich in resources for how to do things. Teaching students to use help menus is a valuable skill in terms of self-reliance in a 21st century world.

5. Reward. In trying to gamify the first module in one of my courses, I reward students with 24 hour extensions for completing groups of tasks, which I call levels. This has been an inexpensive means to reinforce routines, procedures and tools that we’ll be using. Kids want the small tokens I give them and the badges I developed. Schoology let me monitor and keep this system organized.

My strategy in working with cool new tools and strategies has always been to jump in and see what happens. After the class ends, assess the fall-out and then make it better. If you take this approach, and you’re jumping into Schoology, just keep going, building, and making it better for you and your students.

For those who move with more caution, then, consider the above, and then just start, go slow, figure out how it will work for you.

Either way, keep going and making the classroom better for you and your students.

 

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