Smore to Schoology

The response to my last blog was much stronger than anticipated. I’m following it up with a quick link with directions to embed your Smores into Schoology pages.

Good luck!

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Getting Smore from Your Schoology Pages

The other day I was working with a colleague who was getting Schoology courses setup for the start of the year. At Canandaigua, we’ve done away with teacher webpages, so all teachers are using the LMS as their web presence for students and parents.

In our old system, Schoolworld, my colleague had a notable website. Particularly because it was a clear reflection of her personality–lots of pictures to share  her passion for video games, like the Zelda franchise, classic rock and Harry Potter. Students and parents who went to the site not only knew the course, its materials, but also were instantly connected to this dynamic teacher.

As we were working to create a page in Schoology for parents, she lamented that the pages in Schoology were, well, boring, with little ability to liven them up with colored backgrounds, or other design features that students and parents might find visually appealing. Below you’ll see what I mean. It’s my “Parent Page” in each of my Schoology courses.


Screenshot 2017-08-30 at 8.26.08 AM
My Schoology Parent Page–Lots of Text and Not Much Else

There wasn’t much I could tell her.

Then, light blub!

At home later in the day, I started playing with Smore–a web-based flyer and newsletter designer–as part of a project to aggregate blog posts from our student and teacher bloggers into a weekly newsletter to help them build their audiences.

I happened to notice that one of the sharing tools was an embed link. I quickly copied it off the flyer I was working on, went into my Schoology resources, opened a practice page, and embedded the link.

It worked, and the Smore flyer was there on the page.

Screenshot 2017-08-30 at 11.52.16 AM
A Smore Embedded into a Schoology Page

There are some advantages to this approach as I see it.

First, there are a lot of design and layout features available in Smore that are eye-catching and visually appealing. Second, these modifications could be furthered to use Smore for personalized student playlists or assignments with lots of links. Already looking around Smore’s “Educator Hive” you can find example of teachers who have used this approach. While I’m fully committed to using Schoology as my content delivery system, I’m thinking of using Smore to help give me another option in my playbook.

While these advantages exist, there are some drawbacks. Smore is another tool to learn. Teachers who may already be overwhelmed with trying to learn a new LMS, coupled with a smattering of apps, could easily throw their hands-up at you.

Still, for tech-savy teachers looking to keep their parents and students in Schoology, and looking to spice up the look of their pages, embedding Smores into the pages provides an interesting option.

 

 

Social Media & Digital Tools Inventory

Reaching for a sketchnote topic yesterday, I thought about the different digital tools I use, for what purposes, and how they help to connect me to other educators, their ideas and the conversations that are important to my learning:

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It’s important to think about how each tool does a 1 part of the job. As educators we need a range of tools to help us accomplish our goals and enhance our own learning.

I’m interested to know what other tools teachers are using to enhance and to develop their practice.

 

Designing Videos for Flipped Learning

I came across a blog article on the Flippedlearning.org website by Kelly Walsh (@emergingedtech) on the elements that make for optimal learning in multimedia design. As myself and many others here at Canandaigua Academy are starting to create videos for flipped classrooms, Walsh’s summary of Richard Mayer’s “12 Principles of Multimedia Learning” is an important text.

Here’s my meager attempt at capturing the 12 principles in today’s sketchnote:

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Flipgrid Fever, the #SLC2017, & Sketchnoting Trials

The thing about the 30 day sketchnote challenge, I’m finding, is that it’s pushing me to be reading articles and blogs every day to have content to think and to reflect on. Today, I was inspired by Karly Moura’s (@karlymoura) blog on the uses of Flipgrid. Of the 15 uses she provides for this great new tool, I whittled it down to the ones that I could really see myself using.

Our #SLC2017 challenge has many of us at Canandaigua Academy chomping at the bit to use Flipgrid. Moura’s blog gives us some great ways to use this tool across contents and grade-levels.

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In trying to improve my sketchnoting, I’m finding that Pinterest is giving me guidance on icons, borders, frames and layout. Here’s hoping for improvement.

Starting to Pull Citizenship, Leadership, and Literacy Together

I’m spending some time pulling various threads of readings, conversations, and writing together.

Here’s my first effort to think about what it is that high school students need to know and to be able to do:

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But, I’m missing things. In my sketchnote above, I’m really thinking about digital safety. There’s way more that high school students need. Going back to the drawing board, literally.

Watch for my remix tomorrow.

This year we started with our campus-wide adoption of Enterprise Level Schoology. We’ve done a great job at providing our teachers with a wide range of professional development options–both during the school day through department and faculty meetings, as well as after school trainings–to get the basics of how to operate the Schoology platform.

Teachers know how to login, navigate to different pages, create pages, assignments, quizzes, rubrics.

Yet, it feels like in many ways we’re still falling short. Teachers struggle to apply. We hear, “I know how to do it, but I don’t know how to do it in my classroom.” In speaking with my technology-integration colleagues, we know that we have to emphasize how to organize courses.

One of the challenges of using a tool like Schoology is that the approach to use is highly individualized. Users have to consider their teaching styles, a plan for how they’ll use Schoology, their level of technology access (1-to-1, computer-labs and carts, nothing). Working from the answers to these questions, then they can think about how Schoology will best work for them.

Below, I’ve outlined three broad-stroke ways that a teacher might use Schoology, and begin to organize their course content.  After several years of experience, there are three models that I’d suggest for people.

Use the LMS as a replacement for your webpage

Some of the uninitiated into the potentials of learning management systems, such as Schoology, ask “Is this something that I really need to use?” or “How would I make use of this?”

Have you ever had a kid say, ‘I can’t find that assignment?” or ‘Do you have an extra copy of that worksheet?’ Or, have you ever had a parent ask to be kept updated on your course, or ask for copies of materials to be made available? It’s for these reasons that using Schoology makes sense.

In most schools, districts provide platforms for teachers to have a webpage or web-presence. On these pages teachers typically provide copies of files, resources to access, perhaps a calendar of due dates for parents, links to your syllabus. It’s primarily, then, an information driven resource so that the public and those you serve, have materials they need to be successful. Once those materials are put on the web, students and parents have access to them.

In this model, teachers will use Schoology as a home-base for resources. Either by using pages or attaching files, the coursework  is now available to students whenever they have web-access. When students ask for a copy of a misplaced worksheet or parents ask to have access to assignments so that they can help at home, they can be pointed to your Schoology course.

This is a great option for teachers and schools that don’t have 1-to-1 access to technology or some other limited form of technology access. Additionally, teachers who use a lot of direct instruction and maintain a traditional, teacher-centered approach to their classrooms, will still gain a lot of power of the Schoology platform.

Use the LMS to parallel your classes.

For most teachers, this is the way that Schoology will have the most power and value in their instruction.

Let’s say that your classroom looks similar to the following description: You’ve set up routines with your students where they come to class and do some kind of warm-up for the day while you are taking attendance or checking homework, then move into a vocabulary session, and then the lesson for the day.

In this model, use Schoology to follow along with your lesson. Create a warm-up folder that students know to access. Get them in the routine of accessing this folder when they come to class, organize that folder by date or some system. Or, using the tools in Schoology, turn warm-ups on and off as they are needed.

Have a folder for vocabulary or homework check. And then have folders for the units you are teaching. Turn the folder on for access while you are in the unit and off when you’ve finished it.

Use the LMS as a complete blended-learning environment

I don’t work in a 1-to-1 environment, yet. However, I’ve got my units and projects planned so that I know when I’m going to be in need of computers, so I sign-out the computer labs. Each of my projects is broken down into a series of steps. I place these steps as either assignments or pages (a discussion of how and why I do this can happen at another time). All I then have to do with my students is tell them what steps they should be working on during class. I might say, “By Friday, you’ll need to be through step number three,” or “Today you should finish step number 2.” You’ll see from the pictures below, not only am I organizing by step, I’m also explicit in my instructions about what to do and how to proceed through the unit, how they can show completion of the steps.

I have used Schoology’s “Completion Rules” on the folders, and this is a helpful tool to keep track of student progress, as well as keeping students moving through the unit in a way that helps them to consume course content in a manageable and purposeful fashion.

Below, I have an example of the step and its directions. For each step, explicit directions tell students how to complete the step and if any submission is required.

Another example of directions and submission requirements.

You’ll see in the image above, I’ve got each of the steps set as assignments. This way, the assignments show up in the calendar and in the “upcoming” list of to-dos. Also, each assignment acts as a check point or piece of formative assessment.

Regardless of the model you might embrace, here are some standard practices that will make it easier for your students and your parents to navigate your course:

  1. Organize materials into folders, label the folders, and if possible, as it is in Schoology, color-code the folders.
  2. Number the materials inside of the folder.
  3. Meta-teach. Instruct your students on how you’ve organized, and how you want them to use Schoology in your course. The way you do this will change, and that’s not a bad thing, but organic to teaching and learning Schoology. If you change the way that you do it, just tell your students.
  4. Because many of my assignments incorporate choice in both the kinds of products that students can create, as well as the modes of creation–text-based, audio, video, image–I have page of resources that students can access for digital making. Such a page allows students to gain access to tools such as Adobe Spark, Canva, Screencastify as resources for.

I’ll be honest, making the jump to working in Schoology is a commitment. You have to get your stuff there, and then make kids access what you’ve put there. For me, getting to this point has been a multi-year process. Most of what I’ve shared above has come through trial and error, experience, and really listening to my students. 

I full expect that next year, in a 1-to-1 environment, pushing my teaching to further work with blended learning, having students be able to access materials from their Chromebooks all the time, as well as having parents have access will continue to allow my work with Schoology to evolve.